As Supreme Court battle roils DC, suburban voters shrug

Published 07-14-2018

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OMAHA, Nebraska (AP) – It will probably shift the nation's highest court for a generation, but President Donald Trump's move to fill a Supreme Court vacancy is barely cracking the consciousness of some voters in the nation's top political battlegrounds.

Even among this year's most prized voting bloc – educated suburban women – there's no evidence that a groundswell of opposition to a conservative transformation of the judicial branch, which could lead to the erosion or reversal of Roe v. Wade, will significantly alter the trajectory of the midterms, particularly in the House.

Many of those on the left who are already energized to punish Trump's party this fall remain so. Republicans who are lukewarm on the party's unfinished business are encouraged by the potential for action.

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Marlene Burkgren, 67, of Ashburn, Va., teaches a Tai Chi class at Cascades Loudoun County Senior Center, Tuesday, July 10, 2018, in Sterling, Va. It stands to shift the direction of the nation’s highest court for decades, but President Donald Trump’s move to fill a Supreme Court vacancy has barely cracked the consciousness of voters in the nation’s top political battlegrounds. In northern Virginia, here two-term Congresswoman Barbara Comstock is considered one of the nation’s most vulnerable Republicans, Burkgren says she feels powerless to stop Trump’s party from confirming Kavanaugh. “I’m a little disappointed with the way things have worked out,” said Burkgren, a volunteer teach tai chi teacher at the local senior center.(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) - The Associated Press


Marlene Burkgren, 67, of Ashburn, Va., teaches a Tai Chi class at Cascades Loudoun County Senior Center, Tuesday, July 10, 2018, in Sterling, Va. It stands to shift the direction of the nation’s highest court for decades, but President Donald Trump’s move to fill a Supreme Court vacancy has barely cracked the consciousness of voters in the nation’s top political battlegrounds. In northern Virginia, here two-term Congresswoman Barbara Comstock is considered one of the nation’s most vulnerable Republicans, Burkgren says she feels powerless to stop Trump’s party from confirming Kavanaugh. “I’m a little disappointed with the way things have worked out,” said Burkgren, a volunteer teach tai chi teacher at the local senior center.(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) - The Associated Press